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Poll Time - Reading Or Listening To The Bible, What's Better?

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Poll: Reading or listening to the Bible, What's better (15 member(s) have cast votes)

In your opinion what is more effective?

  1. Reading the Bible (9 votes [60.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 60.00%

  2. Listening to the bible (1 votes [6.67%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.67%

  3. Voted Either one is just as effective (5 votes [33.33%])

    Percentage of vote: 33.33%

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#1 Nick

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 09:24 PM

So in your opinion which is more of an effective way to get in the word of God? 


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Life without God is like an un sharpened pencil ... It has no point.
 
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#2 Tian

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 09:49 PM

Reading for me.
There is just something unique in quietness. It manifests peace in a way. Words heard get easily lost in me and I don't really recall much of the stuff I hear unless I listen attentively, but in reading, you really get into thinking and sinking it inside.
Besides, whenever we read, we really focus on what we are reading and our other senses get a bit low. Unlike in just listening, we are more open to distractions. But that might just be for me. 

Maybe it works differently for others :)


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#3 Bethany

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 11:38 AM

I really think that it doesn't matter as long as you're learning and growing. For me personally, it varies. It all depends on what is being taught, rather than the method. I like having my own quiet time with God, but I also like group settings where you can discuss things and encourage each other. 


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For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.


#4 araphaxdeep

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 04:03 PM

I enjoy both. When I'm reading, I feel like it's one-on-one time with me and God. When I'm at church and I'm hearing the word, then that feels more like learning as a group. My husband listens to a lot of sermon podcasts from various pastors/teachers, he seems to really enjoy that. I think getting a portion of both is spiritually healthy. God uses his word to speak to us and he also uses people to speak to us, not just person to person but through the preaching of his word. 


Joy is happiness that lasts and that comes from God -Bob the Tomato 


#5 Nick

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 09:18 PM

I like to read and listen at the same time. I use an app that let's you do both. 

For me it's a great way to listen/learn.

 

But I agree with Tian  when it comes to really digging in i like the quietness of my leather bound bible


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Life without God is like an un sharpened pencil ... It has no point.
 
"but with God all things are possible" - Matt 19:26b

#6 dermasse

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 06:06 PM

Adult learners retain information by differing methods: auditory (hearing), visual (seeing), kinesthetic (doing). Many of us primarily learn by one of those methods, but some learn by all three equally. I'm visual. I tried listening to the audio Bible, but I start thinking about something said in the recording (picturing it in my mind a good visual learner does), and before I know, the narrator is in the next chapter.


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#7 Guest_Pleistenes_*

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 12:02 AM

Each is just as bad.

#8 Brightie

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 02:51 PM

Mm... I guess that depends on what you mean by "effective." And also on who's doing the reading, and whether I've had my morning coffee yet. ;)

 

Pleistenes: I see on your profile that you're an atheist, so no surprise that you wouldn't see Bible reading as neccesary or particularly useful. But I am curious about the wording "bad." Do you see Bible-reading as being actively detrimental, or just as a time-waster? Not meaning to be antagonistic, just curious. I know there are at least as wide a range of philosophical stripes among atheists as among Christians, given that the only neccesary predicate for the term is a disbelief in the existence of God.


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#9 Guest_Pleistenes_*

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 05:48 PM

The bible is about the most graphic novel I've ever laid my hands on.

#10 Brightie

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 10:42 PM

Hm. Running a mental review... There are only a few passages which stand out to me as graphic in the sense of being explicit, although there are lenty of places where stuff is stated without much description which it would be hard to translate to the silver screen without an R rating. I do wonder, though, what percentage of it would be graphic if you added up the battle and sex scenes and compared them to the preaching and poetry and philosophy parts, and the less-graphic stories? Do you know if anybody's looked into that?

 

I will admit that if you're running straight through, there are a lot of passages that raise hard questions, or that you just wonder whether this part was supposed to have a point or whether it's just an example of humans being jerks. But I don't know how many people read straight through on a regular basis, and how many people more... pick out the preaching, philosophy, and poetry passages that they enjoy most to re-read, or jump around doing topical studies to try to either figure out what the Bible has to say about thus-and-such or get some backing for their opinion on thus-and-such. If that makes sense.


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Please believe / you're beautiful when you're not made up// -kmax


#11 Onefinefeller

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 07:31 PM

The Bible... I guess it could be considered a novel; but the different authors and the different styles of the writings should be considered. What about the prophecies? Most came true already. And clearly we know from the syntax the approximate age of most of the books. How many novels have you read that had 100% prophecy come true hundreds to thousands of years later? Much of the Bible is historical in nature. Some of which has been confirmed by discoveries in biblical archaeology. 

 

Jesus' crucifixion was not a novel. It really happened and this was confirmed not only by the witnesses within the text of the Bible but also by a number of outside witnesses. I have the writings of Josephus Flavius in my library at home. He was the Roman historian of the day and was hostile towards Jesus. He wrote of his death in his writings. There are others... Tacitus, Clement of Rome. There are about 2200 documents outside of the Bible that can be used as evidence. 

 

Once we can clearly establish that Jesus was crucified; it is easy to prove His resurrection from the dead using logic. Matter of fact; you don't need to rely on me. A number of atheists have done their homework. As the result of their research; they converted. Here are a couple of books for you... "New Evidence that Demands a Verdict" by Professor Josh McDowell. He is a former atheist who sought to prove that the Bible was a myth. Lee Strobel has written three books. He also was a atheist syndicated journalist of the Chicago Tribune. "The Case for Christ" is a good one. There are lots of others.

 

No my friend; the Bible is no myth. Will you be a open minded juror and study the evidence for yourself? It is your soul that is on the line... bow your knee to God now... or be forced to bow your knee later at your judgment.  



#12 zomok

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Posted 31 May 2016 - 06:03 AM

Whether you are reading the Bible or listening to someone recite it, you must understand that a number of styles and/or genre exist.  There is literal wording. There also can be found metaphors and symbolism, figures of speech, poetry, along with hyperbole. There is also the use of special numbers... For example, in Psalm 50, it says that God owns the cattle on a thousand hills, but we know that God owns all the cattle on all the hills, so "thousand (1000)" is indicating completeness.  There are also those Judgment metaphors like we see in Isaiah 19:1, where it tells us that the Lord is "riding on a swift cloud" to Egypt.  This is a metaphor and the Lord is not literally surfing on a cloud!  It simply indicates that judgment is coming to Egypt..

 

At any rate that is my 2 or 3 cents for the moment.  I am concerned that many Christians do not realize these things.


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